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Success Doesn't Just Happen, It's Planned

Is Your Plan Is Working?

Indicators are how you will be able to measure performance in scenario planning and implementation.  Think of it just like the dashboard in a car or truck where you have a number of indicators that inform you about the performance of your vehicle.  For example, you have a speedometer to tell you how fast the vehicle is moving, you have a fuel gauge so you know how much fuel is left before you hit a critical threshold of running out of gas, and you normally also have a temperature gauge so you know how hot the engine is and therefore how well your cooling system is working.  These are all indicators.

Defining an appropriate set of indicators at the earliest stages of the planning process is crucial because it influences many subsequent decisions including the study area boundary, how the landscape is stratified, and what data and information will be needed. 

What makes a good indicator?

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  • It fits with the interest of the target...
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5 Actions To Earn Social License For Your Project

How can you get people on side and supporting your project and avoid being mired in conflict and resistance? Start by doing these 5 things:

1.    Be Grateful

  • Gratitude is the language of happiness. Being grateful will make you and all those around you happier and that will shine favourably on your project too
  • Showing appreciation for everyone’s contribution brings more meaning to the work, it increases everyone’s self esteem and this adds energy and enthusiasm
  • Humbleness makes it easier to network and removes opposition
  • Gratitude is the best attitude :)

2.    Have Integrity

  • Builds trust
  • Builds loyalty
  • Others will see you as a leader and they will share your ideas with others building momentum for your project
  • “Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching”

3.    Add Value

  • Invest in the place & people where you will do business.
  • Have a vested interest in the wellbeing...
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Planning Is More Valuable Than The Plan

You read that right - the process is more valuable than the product!
There are at least a zillion quotes about how important planning is to achieve success. And that is because generations of experience have proven planning to be a critical success factor – in anything you are trying to accomplish.


“ a good plan is like a road map: it shows the final destination and usually the best way to get there” - Stanley Judd. 
There is a lot of wisdom in that quote beyond the obvious. Clearly we know that a road map improves our chances of a successful journey.  I like to think of plans this way too – it’s a nice metaphor.

But the gold that is not so obvious to everyone, the greater wisdom, is that it is “the planning” that is of greatest value, not the plan.

it is in the planning where you

        • gain knowledge, acquire insight, find inspiration
        • develop an understanding of the system
        • make yourself aware of the risks and rewards of different...
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3 Reasons We Don't Agree On Climate Change

It is difficult for us all to agree on what we should do about fossil fuels and climate change
here’s 3 reasons why

1. Instant vs Delayed Gratification


All of us find ourselves making choices about our behavior everyday - whether to act for immediate benefit or to invest in future benefits. It’s a difficult struggle that crosses many basic lines – food, exercise, finance, relationships, – the list is very long. Behavior Psychologists have shown us time and again that when we make decisions to invest in the future and delay gratification – we are more successful. But for many, perhaps most, the pain of discipline is too high when the opportunity of immediate gratification is at hand.

When we think about this struggle in terms of climate change, we can boil it down to differences in whether we are willing to accept short-term pain for long-term gain – or maybe more modestly – long-term sustain. 


As an example, oil transport...

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US Election A Reminder - Nobody Has A Crystal Ball

None of us has a crystal ball we can use to predict the future. Our ability to anticipate future outcomes is limited by our understanding of the complex systems we are a part of. And these systems are in constant flux - subject to both cyclical and random disruptors. The outcome of the US Election is a good reminder for us that our understanding of these systems is shallow and uncertainty is real. Despite 24 hour/day monitoring, researching and discussion for 18 months – the experts were not able to predict what happened.


And yet, we know that the choices we make today will directly influence the outcomes of the future. So, how do we go about planning for an unpredictable future with less than a full understanding of the dynamics at play? Well, to start there are 5 key drivers of change that need to be considered; social, economic, ecological, technical and political. And rarely do these drivers act independently either – it is usually a mix...

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Did You Watch Before The Flood?

“The most powerful person in the world is the storyteller. The storyteller sets the vision, values and agenda of an entire generation that is to come.” – Steve Jobs


Did you watch Before The Flood? You should – don’t rely on the pundits to tell you what to think about it – evaluate the message for yourself. And do yourself a favour and leave your “position” on climate change at the door for 90 minutes.

Leonardo DiCaprio uses story telling to convey his message that climate change is something we should all be taking seriously. Using powerful visuals, the movie shares some of the less desirable cause // effect relationships between humans and the Earth through the industrial age. It goes on to describe the “Business As Usual” scenario for the future – that is, if we keep doing what we’ve been doing, then we should expect some very unpleasant outcomes. 

Most importantly, the movie...

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Project Conflicts Driven By Answering The Wrong Question

THE ANSWER: THE PROPOSED PROJECT WILL HAVE NO SIGNIFICANT NEGATIVE EFFECT


Read just about any Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and this is the answer you will find. And of course the project will bring significant benefits or we wouldn’t be contemplating it. #Duh 

But think about this for a moment. If there are no significant negative effects, shouldn’t the environment be pretty much pristine? It’s not pristine – so what gives here?

We the public ask the assessors the wrong question. Now, I am most familiar with the process in Canada, but it is my understanding that to a large extent, EIA’s around the world approach project assessments similarly. To greatly simplify it, the question we ask those who must assess the benefits and costs of proposed projects goes something like this, “compared to today, will there be any residual (left over) negative effects after we apply mitigation (first aid)?”

The key here...

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Floodplains Are Key To Public Safety

Reports of human loss and suffering from flooding are reported at least weekly, if not nightly, in mainstream media. And while the axiom “if it bleeds it leads” may heighten our perception of how bad it is, the impacts of floods on people and their homes is on the rise. According to the report Cities and Flooding [1] commissioned by the World Bank, the 10-year moving median # of reported flood events is rising steadily and is a full 16 times higher in 2010 than 50 years earlier.

But floods are nothing new. Rather, they are natural events that have been happening for millennia, shaping the earth we live on and creating much of the natural bounty that supports us today. 

Still, we villainize nature when she brings us harm. Floods, like wildfires, have gotten a very bad name because of the harm to people we associate with these events. But Mother Nature is not the problem. Dr. Gilbert White, the late founder of the internationally recognized...

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Splendour Without Diminishment

We British Columbians have a common vision for our future – one that sees us benefit and enjoy the land, air and waters that sustain us today – but one that also recognizes that today’s use of these resources must be tempered by the knowledge that we do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors, rather we borrow it from our children. This common vision is reflected in our commitment to sustainable development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. It’s even deftly captured in the Provincial motto of BC – Splendor Sine Occasu – translated from Latin to mean Splendor Without Diminishment. 

And despite this awareness, the path towards our future seems strewn with conflict, misunderstanding, mistrust and frustration. Disagreement over land use is one of the biggest sore spots. Whether it is the conflict at Burnaby Mountain over Kinder Morgan’s pipeline survey work,...

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11 Crucial Requirements To Get Cumulative Effects Right

 

Recently I had the opportunity to participate as a speaker and a delegate at two excellent conferences in British Columbia, Canada centered on cumulative effects assessment;

Columbia Mountain Institute Applied Ecology’s Environmental and Social Assessment Forum http://cmiae.org/event/enviroandsocialassessment/


Canadian Institute Energy Group’s Cumulative Effects and the Future of Natural Resource Management http://www.canadianinstitute.com/2016/343/cumulative-effects-and-the-future-of-natural-resource-management

First let me share that both events were extremely well organized and a pleasure to be a part of.   Both Hailey Ross (CMIAE) and Elizabeth Dempsey (CI Energy Group) are outstanding organizers. Both events had excellent speakers and delegates providing good learning and dialogue from range of perspectives.

I found much of what was discussed was in-line with what I believe are crucial requirements for getting Cumulative Effects...

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